Schedule

A detailed schedule is provided below. The sessions will take place on the St. John's campus. Participants will gather in the atrium of the Bruneau Centre for Innovation in Research, with opening and closing remarks, and all three keynote addresses located in the second floor auditorium (IIC-2001).

Breakout sessions will take place in the Arts & Administration building. This building can be accessed from the Bruneau Center via a skywalk (directional signage will be posted)

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Registration
8:15am - 8:40am
Location : IIC 1st Floor Atrium
Land Acknowledgement
8:40am - 8:45am
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
A land acknowledgement is offered to recognize Aboriginal peoples' enduring
connection to their traditional territories, to recognize the history of the land that
is currently shared by many peoples, and to recognize stewardship as a shared
commitment of all those who reside in a territory. The practice of territory
acknowledgement is itself a replication of an Aboriginal practice which predates
European contact.

Read by Mr. Jason Geary, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning
Keynote :: Opening Address
8:45am - 9:00am
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
Welcome and introducion of opening speaker by Mr. Robert Wells, Interim Director, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning, Memorial University

Opening remarks by Dr. Noreen Golfman, Provost and Vice-President (Academic), Memorial University
Keynote :: Faculty Keynote Address
9:00am - 10:00am
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
Delivered by Dr. Danny Dyer, Faculty of Science, Mathematics & Statastics, Memorial University
Keynote :: Plenary Session: A Leadership Panel on Transformative Learning
10:00am - 11:00am
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
The panel will consist of Dr. Alice Gaudine, Dean of Nursing; Dr. Donna Hardy-Cox, Dean of Social Work; Dr. Jeff Keshen, Vice President of Grenfell campus; Dr. Robert Shea, Vice-President,Academic & Student Affairs of Marine Institute
Refreshments Available
11:00am - 11:10am
Location : Arts & Administration 1st Floor Atrium
Coffee, tea, juice, water, fresh fruit & muffins will be available to conference delegates
Engaging 250 students with bubbles and tinfoil: Active learning in large classrooms
Location : AA-1046
Why do we teach the way we do? The top priority of university instructors today is not only to effectively deliver course curriculum; instructors must also engage and excite students and provide them with a satisfying university experience. The large classrooms faced by instructors and students present unique challenges. The current generation of students is often fast paced and looks for motivation to learn. Students want to see how their studies apply to the world around them and what the possibilities are. These students are keen, eager, and insightful. They are full of questions and are driven to succeed. How do we meet these students and give a rich university experience in the large lecture theatre? I will share some of my methods and strategies for working with and engaging students in classes of two hundred or more. I will demonstrate some of my most effective methods of transforming the large lectures into opportunities to "discover" during class. The classes come alive when each student takes part in a hands-on demonstration or uses a related phone app or computer simulation. Active learning is part of every class during small group work and discussion time. I see these methods as transferrable across all disciplines and I look forward to contributions from conference attendees about how these methods could work in their classes.

Presented by Dr. Kelly Shorlin, Faculty of Science, Physics & Physical Oceanography
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 11:1026-04-2018 12:00America/St_JohnsEngaging 250 students with bubbles and tinfoil: Active learning in large classroomsWhy do we teach the way we do? The top priority of university instructors today is not only to effectively deliver course curriculum; instructors must also engage and excite students and provide them with a satisfying university experience. The large classrooms faced by instructors and students present unique challenges. The current generation of students is often fast paced and looks for motivation to learn. Students want to see how their studies apply to the world around them and what the possibilities are. These students are keen, eager, and insightful. They are full of questions and are driven to succeed. How do we meet these students and give a rich university experience in the large lecture theatre? I will share some of my methods and strategies for working with and engaging students in classes of two hundred or more. I will demonstrate some of my most effective methods of transforming the large lectures into opportunities to "discover" during class. The classes come alive when each student takes part in a hands-on demonstration or uses a related phone app or computer simulation. Active learning is part of every class during small group work and discussion time. I see these methods as transferrable across all disciplines and I look forward to contributions from conference attendees about how these methods could work in their classes.

Presented by Dr. Kelly Shorlin, Faculty of Science, Physics & Physical Oceanography
AA-1046

All that Feedback from Professional Learning Sessions, Now What?
Location : AA-1049
In this session participants will be taken through the new data collection process for professional learning offered to teachers by NLESD using Google. Participants will be shown how the data is sorted, analyzed and how feedback shapes the planning for future professional learning sessions. Those in attendance will also learn how NLESD is provisioning professional learning using a mix of synchronous/asynchronous and virtual/face to face which is in alignment with both current research and adult learning theories. the session will end with an examination of some of that teacher feedback to show how it is impacting teacher perception and practices.

Presented by Mr. Richard Snow, Newfoundland Labrador English School District
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 11:1026-04-2018 12:00America/St_JohnsAll that Feedback from Professional Learning Sessions, Now What?In this session participants will be taken through the new data collection process for professional learning offered to teachers by NLESD using Google. Participants will be shown how the data is sorted, analyzed and how feedback shapes the planning for future professional learning sessions. Those in attendance will also learn how NLESD is provisioning professional learning using a mix of synchronous/asynchronous and virtual/face to face which is in alignment with both current research and adult learning theories. the session will end with an examination of some of that teacher feedback to show how it is impacting teacher perception and practices.

Presented by Mr. Richard Snow, Newfoundland Labrador English School District
AA-1049

Transforming Interprofessional Education (IPE) facilitation: Demonstrating an innovative video-based facilitator training intervention
Location : AA-1043
This interactive workshop will showcase our video-based method of facilitator training. Participants will be introduced to: the relevant literature; the goals of Memorial's IPE curricula; how and why the video-based modelling training was developed and summaries of facilitator and student feedback about the impact of the training. To further enrich the experience, participants will be given an opportunity to participate in an abbreviated version of the training including small and large group activities designed to enhance awareness of personal facilitation behaviours and the ability to effectively manage challenging group interactions. Following the simulated training, we will explore how the training can be immediately transformative in increasing facilitator confidence and skill in managing group interactions especially when destructive. The longer term transformative potential is related to shifting focus in interpersonal interaction from the content to the process of the interaction. We believe the video-based intervention redirects attention to the process of the group interaction and in so doing deepens learner understanding of the complexities of team functioning. We will emphasize how the combination of the modelling of facilitator responses and the interactive quality of the training creates a learning environment that is consistent with best practice in andragogy and thus has greatest potential for transformative learning. We will end by highlighting the importance of facilitator training in terms of enacting widespread change in practice for health/social professionals as part of our provincial IPE curriculum.

Presented by Dr. Olga Heath, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Ms. Beulah Jesso, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Mrs. Chelsey PcPhee, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Dr. Caroline Porr, Memorial University School of Nursing; Mr. Adam Reid, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Dr. Nicole Snow. Memorial University School of Nursing
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 11:1026-04-2018 12:00America/St_JohnsTransforming Interprofessional Education (IPE) facilitation: Demonstrating an innovative video-based facilitator training interventionThis interactive workshop will showcase our video-based method of facilitator training. Participants will be introduced to: the relevant literature; the goals of Memorial's IPE curricula; how and why the video-based modelling training was developed and summaries of facilitator and student feedback about the impact of the training. To further enrich the experience, participants will be given an opportunity to participate in an abbreviated version of the training including small and large group activities designed to enhance awareness of personal facilitation behaviours and the ability to effectively manage challenging group interactions. Following the simulated training, we will explore how the training can be immediately transformative in increasing facilitator confidence and skill in managing group interactions especially when destructive. The longer term transformative potential is related to shifting focus in interpersonal interaction from the content to the process of the interaction. We believe the video-based intervention redirects attention to the process of the group interaction and in so doing deepens learner understanding of the complexities of team functioning. We will emphasize how the combination of the modelling of facilitator responses and the interactive quality of the training creates a learning environment that is consistent with best practice in andragogy and thus has greatest potential for transformative learning. We will end by highlighting the importance of facilitator training in terms of enacting widespread change in practice for health/social professionals as part of our provincial IPE curriculum.

Presented by Dr. Olga Heath, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Ms. Beulah Jesso, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Mrs. Chelsey PcPhee, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Dr. Caroline Porr, Memorial University School of Nursing; Mr. Adam Reid, Faculty of Medicine, Centre for Collaborative Health Professional Education; Dr. Nicole Snow. Memorial University School of Nursing
AA-1043

Using interactive texts and lectures in teaching mathematics as a way to initiate transformative learning
Location : AA-1045
Transformative learning occurs when the learner becomes aware and critical of assumptions, leading them to reinterpret prior experience and change their perspective. In a theoretical course, transformative learning produces a noticeable change in ones' understanding about the object of study – when the learner starts seeing the object in a new light. In view of the SOLO taxonomy, it could be a change from knowing some properties of an object (perceived as independent) to establishing a relation between them, relating them to other known properties, or to extending (generalizing) them to new situations. In this session we will discuss the role of interactive texts and interactive lectures in mathematics as means to initiate and foster transformative learning. An interactive text is a computer-based reading material that gives students the opportunity to experiment with mathematical figures and equations independently. Lectures could contain interactive elements of different kinds, including questioning techniques possibly also mediated by technology. A good interactive text or lecture could serve as both a media (with its intention to inform and direct the learner towards an answer) and a milieu (which allows the learned to find their own approaches, interpretations and means to validate their answer). Our goal is to discuss the necessity and different purposes of interactions in order to identify those that could promote students' learning, and in particular, a transformation of their frames of reference.

Presented by Dr. Margo Kondratieva, Faculty of Education; Ms. Beth Ann Austin, Faculty of Science, Mathematics & Statistics
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 11:1026-04-2018 12:00America/St_JohnsUsing interactive texts and lectures in teaching mathematics as a way to initiate transformative learningTransformative learning occurs when the learner becomes aware and critical of assumptions, leading them to reinterpret prior experience and change their perspective. In a theoretical course, transformative learning produces a noticeable change in ones' understanding about the object of study – when the learner starts seeing the object in a new light. In view of the SOLO taxonomy, it could be a change from knowing some properties of an object (perceived as independent) to establishing a relation between them, relating them to other known properties, or to extending (generalizing) them to new situations. In this session we will discuss the role of interactive texts and interactive lectures in mathematics as means to initiate and foster transformative learning. An interactive text is a computer-based reading material that gives students the opportunity to experiment with mathematical figures and equations independently. Lectures could contain interactive elements of different kinds, including questioning techniques possibly also mediated by technology. A good interactive text or lecture could serve as both a media (with its intention to inform and direct the learner towards an answer) and a milieu (which allows the learned to find their own approaches, interpretations and means to validate their answer). Our goal is to discuss the necessity and different purposes of interactions in order to identify those that could promote students' learning, and in particular, a transformation of their frames of reference.

Presented by Dr. Margo Kondratieva, Faculty of Education; Ms. Beth Ann Austin, Faculty of Science, Mathematics & Statistics
AA-1045

Buffet Lunch
12:00pm - 1:00pm
Location : IIC 1st Floor Atrium
Lunch will be served buffet-style.
Keynote :: Industry Keynote Address
1:00pm - 2:00pm
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
Delivered Mr. John Baker, President & CEO of D2L
Fostering Transformative Learning Experiences Through the Use of Universal Design in Learning
Location : AA-1046
Building upon the work of Mezirow and others, one of the more recent conceptions of transformative learning theory has focused on the neurobiological components of learning. From this perspective, it has been suggested that learning is strongly rooted in the experiences, interests, and needs of students. Furthermore, this view proposes that learning is strengthened by providing students with a variety of sensory experiences and acknowledges the natural variability between learners. This conception of transformative learning, with its emphasis on neurobiology is closely aligned with the principles and guidelines of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), the theory of which draws heavily form cognitive neuroscience research. This research continues to inform the development of instructional materials and equitable learning spaces, including but not limited to the use of technology to support teaching and learning. Originally envisioned to ensure more equitable educational experiences for students with disabilities, UDL has been increasingly shown to enhance learning experience for a growing number of learners allowing for greater equity and diversity in formal learning spaces.

Presented by Mr. Jason Geary, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning; Dr. Gabrielle Young, Faculty of Education; Dr. Ailsa Craig, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 14:0526-04-2018 14:55America/St_JohnsFostering Transformative Learning Experiences Through the Use of Universal Design in LearningBuilding upon the work of Mezirow and others, one of the more recent conceptions of transformative learning theory has focused on the neurobiological components of learning. From this perspective, it has been suggested that learning is strongly rooted in the experiences, interests, and needs of students. Furthermore, this view proposes that learning is strengthened by providing students with a variety of sensory experiences and acknowledges the natural variability between learners. This conception of transformative learning, with its emphasis on neurobiology is closely aligned with the principles and guidelines of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), the theory of which draws heavily form cognitive neuroscience research. This research continues to inform the development of instructional materials and equitable learning spaces, including but not limited to the use of technology to support teaching and learning. Originally envisioned to ensure more equitable educational experiences for students with disabilities, UDL has been increasingly shown to enhance learning experience for a growing number of learners allowing for greater equity and diversity in formal learning spaces.

Presented by Mr. Jason Geary, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning; Dr. Gabrielle Young, Faculty of Education; Dr. Ailsa Craig, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
AA-1046

Recalling Moments of Aliveness: Welcoming Surprise
Location : AA-3020
Often in education, the encounters, learning invitations, provocations and outcomes are hemmed in with rules, regulations, restrictions and required assessment. We refer to things as modules, toolboxes, teaching tips, units and systems--all implying that things have a tidy beginning and ending. Tick the box. Move on. When we view learning from the inside--from the vantage point of the learner, we may discover that choice, gesture, improvization and wonder- based learning can be far more meaningful, lasting and motivating. Embracing uncertainty can be energizing for everyone. Come and see what happens.

Presented by Dr. Jan Buley, Faculty of Education; Dr. David Buley, Faculty of Education
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 14:0526-04-2018 14:55America/St_JohnsRecalling Moments of Aliveness: Welcoming SurpriseOften in education, the encounters, learning invitations, provocations and outcomes are hemmed in with rules, regulations, restrictions and required assessment. We refer to things as modules, toolboxes, teaching tips, units and systems--all implying that things have a tidy beginning and ending. Tick the box. Move on. When we view learning from the inside--from the vantage point of the learner, we may discover that choice, gesture, improvization and wonder- based learning can be far more meaningful, lasting and motivating. Embracing uncertainty can be energizing for everyone. Come and see what happens.

Presented by Dr. Jan Buley, Faculty of Education; Dr. David Buley, Faculty of Education
AA-3020

LEADing the Way- Integrating Interdisciplinary Community-Collaborative Programming at Memorial University
Location : AA-1043
The LEAD Semester: Leadership, Engagement, Action, Dialogue, is an exciting new type of undergraduate interdisciplinary offering with a unique pedagogical model at the intersection of dialogue, community engagement, experiential learning, and interdisciplinarity. This session will begin by exploring the philosophical basis of LEAD and how it can facilitate transformative learning experiences for students. The session will inform participants of how LEAD will offer the opportunity for undergraduate students in their final years to spend a semester focusing on an issue of community import within an interdisciplinary cohort. It will include examples of unique pedagogical methods such as public facing projects and cohort-led dialogues on the issue of study. It will also cover delivery structures including expertise of those internal and external to Memorial University, using team teaching to bring together experts in research, pedagogy, and practice. The second half of this presentation will focus on the history and development of LEAD, from its initial study phase as the Semester in Dialogue, borrowing from the model at Simon Fraser University, to a proposal phase for an integrated interdisciplinary offering for final year undergraduate students at Memorial. We will show how consultation, structural navigation, creativity and flexibility have enabled LEAD to be designed and become a potential model for other undergraduate interdisciplinary programming in the future. This session will be of interest to those who want to learn more about dialogic, community-based, interdisciplinary programming and to those who are passionate about implementing this type of transformational learning space at Memorial University.

Presented by Mx. Taylor Stocks, Harris Centre; Dr. Andrea Rose, Faculty of Education; Dr. Kim Myrick, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 14:0526-04-2018 14:55America/St_JohnsLEADing the Way- Integrating Interdisciplinary Community-Collaborative Programming at Memorial UniversityThe LEAD Semester: Leadership, Engagement, Action, Dialogue, is an exciting new type of undergraduate interdisciplinary offering with a unique pedagogical model at the intersection of dialogue, community engagement, experiential learning, and interdisciplinarity. This session will begin by exploring the philosophical basis of LEAD and how it can facilitate transformative learning experiences for students. The session will inform participants of how LEAD will offer the opportunity for undergraduate students in their final years to spend a semester focusing on an issue of community import within an interdisciplinary cohort. It will include examples of unique pedagogical methods such as public facing projects and cohort-led dialogues on the issue of study. It will also cover delivery structures including expertise of those internal and external to Memorial University, using team teaching to bring together experts in research, pedagogy, and practice. The second half of this presentation will focus on the history and development of LEAD, from its initial study phase as the Semester in Dialogue, borrowing from the model at Simon Fraser University, to a proposal phase for an integrated interdisciplinary offering for final year undergraduate students at Memorial. We will show how consultation, structural navigation, creativity and flexibility have enabled LEAD to be designed and become a potential model for other undergraduate interdisciplinary programming in the future. This session will be of interest to those who want to learn more about dialogic, community-based, interdisciplinary programming and to those who are passionate about implementing this type of transformational learning space at Memorial University.

Presented by Mx. Taylor Stocks, Harris Centre; Dr. Andrea Rose, Faculty of Education; Dr. Kim Myrick, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning
AA-1043

The Question in Literature and the Literature on Questions
Location : AA-1045
Of all the rhetorical techniques of teaching well, the question has some of the most transformative potential. Questions become answers; they transform themselves - but on its own a question does nothing. For teachers, learners, and any questioner, the question is an expression of curiosity and critique that can transform everyone involved in questioning and answering. In the proposed 50-minute interactive lesson, we will begin with an informal lecture and Q&A that considers three views of the question, first in the Socratic tradition imagined by the poet Phyllis Webb in her essay "The Question as an Instrument of Torture" (1982) and her poem "A Question of Questions"; second, in the inquiry-based learning model envisioned in biology professor Walter Bateman's Open to Question (1990); and, finally, in a research context by the library and education professor Jean Donham in her essay "Mental Models of Research: Generating Authentic Questions" (2010).

Presented by Dr. Joel Deshaye, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 14:0526-04-2018 14:55America/St_JohnsThe Question in Literature and the Literature on QuestionsOf all the rhetorical techniques of teaching well, the question has some of the most transformative potential. Questions become answers; they transform themselves - but on its own a question does nothing. For teachers, learners, and any questioner, the question is an expression of curiosity and critique that can transform everyone involved in questioning and answering. In the proposed 50-minute interactive lesson, we will begin with an informal lecture and Q&A that considers three views of the question, first in the Socratic tradition imagined by the poet Phyllis Webb in her essay "The Question as an Instrument of Torture" (1982) and her poem "A Question of Questions"; second, in the inquiry-based learning model envisioned in biology professor Walter Bateman's Open to Question (1990); and, finally, in a research context by the library and education professor Jean Donham in her essay "Mental Models of Research: Generating Authentic Questions" (2010).

Presented by Dr. Joel Deshaye, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
AA-1045

Refreshment Available
2:55pm - 3:05pm
Location : Arts & Administration 1st Floor Atrium
Refreshments Available in Arts & Administration Annex 1st floor
Universal Design in Action: A Panel on Universal Design for Learning
Location : AA-1046
A recent neurobiological conception of transformative learning theory suggests that learning is strongly rooted in the experiences, interests, and needs of students. Furthermore, this view proposes that learning is strengthened by providing students with a variety of sensory experiences and acknowledges the inherent variability between learners. This unique conception of transformative learning closely aligns with the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). This exciting panel session will highlight the implementation of Universal Design for Learning and how this approach to curriculum development is currently being used to foster transformative learning experiences here at Memorial. Each panelist will bring a unique and valuable perspective to the discussion. Moderated by the Centre for Innovation in Teaching and Learning, this panel features professionals and scholars in the areas of disability, education, and Universal Design for Learning. Faculty panelists, knowledgeable about Universal Design for Learning will highlight their implementation and application of UDL in course design. A disability service professional will speak to the value of universal design in the creation of equitable learning experiences and share her vision and hopes for the adoption of universal design in learning. The panel will also feature unique student perspectives about how using universal design has contributed to their success in the classroom.

Moderated by Mr. Jason Geary, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning

The panel will consist of Dr. Ailsa Craig, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences; Dr. Gabrielle Young, Faculty of Education; Catherine Shortall, Educational Accessibility Specialist, Blundon Centre; Jen D'eon, Graduate Student at Memorial

Add to Calendar26-04-2018 15:0526-04-2018 15:55America/St_JohnsUniversal Design in Action: A Panel on Universal Design for LearningA recent neurobiological conception of transformative learning theory suggests that learning is strongly rooted in the experiences, interests, and needs of students. Furthermore, this view proposes that learning is strengthened by providing students with a variety of sensory experiences and acknowledges the inherent variability between learners. This unique conception of transformative learning closely aligns with the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL). This exciting panel session will highlight the implementation of Universal Design for Learning and how this approach to curriculum development is currently being used to foster transformative learning experiences here at Memorial. Each panelist will bring a unique and valuable perspective to the discussion. Moderated by the Centre for Innovation in Teaching and Learning, this panel features professionals and scholars in the areas of disability, education, and Universal Design for Learning. Faculty panelists, knowledgeable about Universal Design for Learning will highlight their implementation and application of UDL in course design. A disability service professional will speak to the value of universal design in the creation of equitable learning experiences and share her vision and hopes for the adoption of universal design in learning. The panel will also feature unique student perspectives about how using universal design has contributed to their success in the classroom.

Moderated by Mr. Jason Geary, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning

The panel will consist of Dr. Ailsa Craig, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences; Dr. Gabrielle Young, Faculty of Education; Catherine Shortall, Educational Accessibility Specialist, Blundon Centre; Jen D'eon, Graduate Student at Memorial
AA-1046

Using Brightspace Tools to Build Your Flipped Classroom
Location : AA-1049
A flipped classroom approach takes traditional teaching methods and flips them upside down! Technology is used to deliver lectures outside of the classroom while "homework"-like activities happen in class with the support of peers and teachers. This session will explore three key components of an effective flipped classroom: Developing personalized learning; using assessment data to guide the learner experience; and leveraging the power of collaboration.

Presented by CITL in collaboration with D2L
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 15:0526-04-2018 15:55America/St_JohnsUsing Brightspace Tools to Build Your Flipped ClassroomA flipped classroom approach takes traditional teaching methods and flips them upside down! Technology is used to deliver lectures outside of the classroom while "homework"-like activities happen in class with the support of peers and teachers. This session will explore three key components of an effective flipped classroom: Developing personalized learning; using assessment data to guide the learner experience; and leveraging the power of collaboration.

Presented by CITL in collaboration with D2L
AA-1049

IT Takes a Village: Fostering Student Professionalism at The Commons, QEII Library
Location : AA-1045
Ongoing training, regular performance feedback, reflective practice, and weekly technical "challenges" have been invaluable in making the student staff of The Commons (Queen Elizabeth II Library) more productive, involved, and readily capable of serving clients. We will see the possibilities associated with consolidated training methods and the potential for personal and professional development opportunities.

Presented by Ms. Meaghan Malone, Student Support Assistant, The Commons (QEII)
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 15:0526-04-2018 15:55America/St_JohnsIT Takes a Village: Fostering Student Professionalism at The Commons, QEII LibraryOngoing training, regular performance feedback, reflective practice, and weekly technical "challenges" have been invaluable in making the student staff of The Commons (Queen Elizabeth II Library) more productive, involved, and readily capable of serving clients. We will see the possibilities associated with consolidated training methods and the potential for personal and professional development opportunities.

Presented by Ms. Meaghan Malone, Student Support Assistant, The Commons (QEII)
AA-1045

Effective teaching and transformational learning: You can't have one with the ooooother
Location : AA-1043
Imagine a group of nursing students eagerly preparing to depart on a trip to a developing country. They will be working in a medical aid facility in one of the poorest regions of the country where they will witness, first hand, the pain and suffering that goes along with deficits in medical care. On their return, three weeks later, their perspective on nursing and medical care, their understanding of self and what they can endure, their perceptions of their purpose have all changed. They have transformed. This is just one example of transformative learning and like all transformative learning experiences, effective teaching has been a significant factor. Effective teaching and transformative learning have a symbiotic relationship and in this session participants will explore this relationship and assess the role that teacher efficacy and student engage play the transformation. In this 50-minute session participants will assess the significance of all of these factors in transformative learning within their discipline and work to create learning activities to engage their students experiences that will change how their students think, and feel about the nature of their world.

Presented by Dr. Trudi Johnson, Faculty of Education; Mr. Albert Johnson, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning
Add to Calendar26-04-2018 15:0526-04-2018 15:55America/St_JohnsEffective teaching and transformational learning: You can't have one with the oooootherImagine a group of nursing students eagerly preparing to depart on a trip to a developing country. They will be working in a medical aid facility in one of the poorest regions of the country where they will witness, first hand, the pain and suffering that goes along with deficits in medical care. On their return, three weeks later, their perspective on nursing and medical care, their understanding of self and what they can endure, their perceptions of their purpose have all changed. They have transformed. This is just one example of transformative learning and like all transformative learning experiences, effective teaching has been a significant factor. Effective teaching and transformative learning have a symbiotic relationship and in this session participants will explore this relationship and assess the role that teacher efficacy and student engage play the transformation. In this 50-minute session participants will assess the significance of all of these factors in transformative learning within their discipline and work to create learning activities to engage their students experiences that will change how their students think, and feel about the nature of their world.

Presented by Dr. Trudi Johnson, Faculty of Education; Mr. Albert Johnson, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning
AA-1043

Friday, April 27, 2018

Networking
8:15am - 8:45am
Location : IIC 1st Floor Atrium
An opportunity to recognize, create and act upon collaborative opportunities, share information and seek potential partners in transformative teaching and learning.

Light breakfast items, coffee, tea, juice and water will be available for conference delegates.
Keynote :: Visiting Keynote Address
8:45am - 9:50am
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
Delivered by Dr. David Helfand, Professor of Astronomy, Columbia University
From Where Learning is Provided to Where Learning is Sought: Creating High-Quality Open Learning Opportunities
Location : AA-1049
Math Pod NL is an approach to supporting teachers in their professional learning about mathematics using social media and online tools for teacher learning and creating a platform for engagement. Building on work done in Ontario that Donna Miller Fry and Stephen Hurley were part of, we have used that model to offer teachers in NL a similar experience to consider their own professional learning supports curriculum and instruction in the classroom, and to critically look at practice with a lens on moving it forward. This opportunity can be transformative for teachers in that it provides opportunities for teachers to reflect on their own beliefs, actions, and practices around mathematics learning and change they way they consider and engage in math learning in the classroom. Through individually reading and reflecting on "Young Mathematicians at Work" by Cathy Fosnot, collectively listening to podcasts with the author and Stephen Hurley, engaging in twitter chats that support questioning and reflecting, and connecting with other teachers who are also critically questioning their practices, teachers are nudged in their thinking and encouraged to shift their practices, while creating a broad professional learning network to continue collaborative learning.

Presented by Ms. Allyson Tucker, Newfoundland Labrador English School District; Ms. Donna Miller Fry, Newfoundland Labrador District School Board
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 10:0027-04-2018 10:50America/St_JohnsFrom Where Learning is Provided to Where Learning is Sought: Creating High-Quality Open Learning OpportunitiesMath Pod NL is an approach to supporting teachers in their professional learning about mathematics using social media and online tools for teacher learning and creating a platform for engagement. Building on work done in Ontario that Donna Miller Fry and Stephen Hurley were part of, we have used that model to offer teachers in NL a similar experience to consider their own professional learning supports curriculum and instruction in the classroom, and to critically look at practice with a lens on moving it forward. This opportunity can be transformative for teachers in that it provides opportunities for teachers to reflect on their own beliefs, actions, and practices around mathematics learning and change they way they consider and engage in math learning in the classroom. Through individually reading and reflecting on "Young Mathematicians at Work" by Cathy Fosnot, collectively listening to podcasts with the author and Stephen Hurley, engaging in twitter chats that support questioning and reflecting, and connecting with other teachers who are also critically questioning their practices, teachers are nudged in their thinking and encouraged to shift their practices, while creating a broad professional learning network to continue collaborative learning.

Presented by Ms. Allyson Tucker, Newfoundland Labrador English School District; Ms. Donna Miller Fry, Newfoundland Labrador District School Board
AA-1049

The Transformative Learning of the "Dear data" Project
Location : AA-1043
For novice researchers, collecting data is a daunting but necessary task required to produce a thesis. The range of data sources, amount of information collected, and methods of collection can overwhelm students unfamiliar with the terrain of research. This interactive panel discussion composed of three students and two faculty members will address teaching and learning methods of a doctoral methods course. In particular, the transformative collection learning experiences of the Education 702A/B "Dear data" project will be discussed. This course project was a modification of the work of Lupi and Posavec (2016) and their year-long data collection project. For 50 weeks, Lupi and Posavec collected different types of personal data over seven days and then transformed the data into art-based representation. The Education 702A/B version of "Dear data" required three weeks of personal data collection and was challenging, whimsical, frustrating, and contained many surprising practical and philosophical applications to data collection and representation. The panel will address the benefits of "Dear data" to a novice researcher, such as deciding how much and what to collect. The presentation will also include the perspectives of the two course facilitators and graduate students who have broadly situated research interests (science, literature, art, and music). The panel will describe how "Dear data" created unique contemplations learning for each student, such as why data representation of a music score or coordinate graphs, are essential to the clarity of the data message conveyed to the reader. Lupi, G & Posavec, G. (2016). Dear Data. New York: Princeton Architectural Press.

Moderated by Mr. Patrick Wells, Faculty of Education

The panel will consist of: Dr. Cecile Badenhorst, Faculty of Education; Dr. Beverly Fitzpatrick, Memorial University School of Pharmacy; Ms. Julia Halfyard, Faculty of Education
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 10:0027-04-2018 10:50America/St_JohnsThe Transformative Learning of the "Dear data" ProjectFor novice researchers, collecting data is a daunting but necessary task required to produce a thesis. The range of data sources, amount of information collected, and methods of collection can overwhelm students unfamiliar with the terrain of research. This interactive panel discussion composed of three students and two faculty members will address teaching and learning methods of a doctoral methods course. In particular, the transformative collection learning experiences of the Education 702A/B "Dear data" project will be discussed. This course project was a modification of the work of Lupi and Posavec (2016) and their year-long data collection project. For 50 weeks, Lupi and Posavec collected different types of personal data over seven days and then transformed the data into art-based representation. The Education 702A/B version of "Dear data" required three weeks of personal data collection and was challenging, whimsical, frustrating, and contained many surprising practical and philosophical applications to data collection and representation. The panel will address the benefits of "Dear data" to a novice researcher, such as deciding how much and what to collect. The presentation will also include the perspectives of the two course facilitators and graduate students who have broadly situated research interests (science, literature, art, and music). The panel will describe how "Dear data" created unique contemplations learning for each student, such as why data representation of a music score or coordinate graphs, are essential to the clarity of the data message conveyed to the reader. Lupi, G & Posavec, G. (2016). Dear Data. New York: Princeton Architectural Press.

Moderated by Mr. Patrick Wells, Faculty of Education

The panel will consist of: Dr. Cecile Badenhorst, Faculty of Education; Dr. Beverly Fitzpatrick, Memorial University School of Pharmacy; Ms. Julia Halfyard, Faculty of Education
AA-1043

From transaction to transformation - an evolving perspective on accessibility advising
Location : AA-1046
Since fall 2017, the Blundon Centre (Student Life) has been immersed in its own period of transformation. A new philosophy and approach to working with students, combined with the addition of new members to the team, has made for significant changes in the daily operations of the Centre. The team has been critically assessing the ways we (and our peers across Canada) have supported students with disabilities over the past 25 years. As a result, we are now exploring how to become more intentional and holistic in the way we work with students who come to the Blundon Centre. We hope to demonstrate our new approach to the audience in this session and engage them in a conversation about making education more accessible at Memorial.

Presented by Ms. Beth Ryan, Student Learning Accessibility Advisor, Blundon Centre
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 10:0027-04-2018 10:50America/St_JohnsFrom transaction to transformation - an evolving perspective on accessibility advisingSince fall 2017, the Blundon Centre (Student Life) has been immersed in its own period of transformation. A new philosophy and approach to working with students, combined with the addition of new members to the team, has made for significant changes in the daily operations of the Centre. The team has been critically assessing the ways we (and our peers across Canada) have supported students with disabilities over the past 25 years. As a result, we are now exploring how to become more intentional and holistic in the way we work with students who come to the Blundon Centre. We hope to demonstrate our new approach to the audience in this session and engage them in a conversation about making education more accessible at Memorial.

Presented by Ms. Beth Ryan, Student Learning Accessibility Advisor, Blundon Centre
AA-1046

Getting the most out of virtual classrooms and video assignments
Location : AA-1045
There are always new enhancements to Virtual Classrooms and Video Assignments. We'll specifically look at the workflow and UX changes that have been introduced in recent months. We'll spend the bulk of the time covering specific scenarios where you can use these tools to increase engagement and interaction with your learners, and provide a scalable approach to assessing soft skills.

Presented by CITL in collaboration with D2L
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 10:0027-04-2018 10:50America/St_JohnsGetting the most out of virtual classrooms and video assignmentsThere are always new enhancements to Virtual Classrooms and Video Assignments. We'll specifically look at the workflow and UX changes that have been introduced in recent months. We'll spend the bulk of the time covering specific scenarios where you can use these tools to increase engagement and interaction with your learners, and provide a scalable approach to assessing soft skills.

Presented by CITL in collaboration with D2L
AA-1045

Refreshments Available
10:50am - 11:00am
Location : Arts & Administration 1st Floor Atrium
Coffee, tea, juice & water will be available to conference delegates
Happy About Safety: A Workplace Safety iBooks Creation Project
Location : AA-1046
This session will showcase an innovative and transformative learning project for students enrolled in the Occupational Health and Safety 3202 course at St. Kevin's High School, Goulds Newfoundland. The interactive session will highlight how students, staff and the community collaborated to create a series of digital textbooks relating to young worker safety. The final products, two 40-page interactive iBooks, have become learning resources shared to a global audience via iTunes. This ongoing project has empowered students to become ambassadors of safety in their school, community and far beyond. Session participants will have an opportunity to explore the publications using iPads provided by the presentor or downloaded to their own Apple device.

Presented by Mr. John Goldsworthy, Newfoundland Labrador English School District
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:0027-04-2018 11:50America/St_JohnsHappy About Safety: A Workplace Safety iBooks Creation ProjectThis session will showcase an innovative and transformative learning project for students enrolled in the Occupational Health and Safety 3202 course at St. Kevin's High School, Goulds Newfoundland. The interactive session will highlight how students, staff and the community collaborated to create a series of digital textbooks relating to young worker safety. The final products, two 40-page interactive iBooks, have become learning resources shared to a global audience via iTunes. This ongoing project has empowered students to become ambassadors of safety in their school, community and far beyond. Session participants will have an opportunity to explore the publications using iPads provided by the presentor or downloaded to their own Apple device.

Presented by Mr. John Goldsworthy, Newfoundland Labrador English School District
AA-1046

Using Management Consulting in Transformative Learning for MBA Students
Location : AA-1045
Management consulting is a top career choice for MBA (Masters of Business Administration) students. When management consulting is done well it combines elements of critical thinking, strategy, and research to produce ideas and concepts that benefit individuals, organizations and society. Memorial University has had a course on management consulting for the last ten years. During the time, there have been over 30 consulting projects with local organizations who have paid to have teams of three to four final year MBA students work on issues with their organization. The course, entitled B9035 Management Consulting, is an elective MBA course where MBA students work with organizations to address issues such as feasibility analyses, strategies and labour market surveys. The organizations involved approach the Faculty to participate and pay a fee to participate. The students are required to sign confidentiality agreements and undergo ethics training before they start working with the organizations. All projects are managed by a Faculty member and all reports that are given to companies involve aggregate instead of individual data. The purpose of this presentation is to explore how this course has led to transformative learning both for the students and the organizations. Using the theory of diffusion of innovation, the presentation will group both the students and projects into different categories to exemplify how transformation can occur in learning and, moreover, how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread in experiential learning.

Presented by Dr. Tom Cooper, Faculty of Business Administration, Memorial University
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:0027-04-2018 11:50America/St_JohnsUsing Management Consulting in Transformative Learning for MBA StudentsManagement consulting is a top career choice for MBA (Masters of Business Administration) students. When management consulting is done well it combines elements of critical thinking, strategy, and research to produce ideas and concepts that benefit individuals, organizations and society. Memorial University has had a course on management consulting for the last ten years. During the time, there have been over 30 consulting projects with local organizations who have paid to have teams of three to four final year MBA students work on issues with their organization. The course, entitled B9035 Management Consulting, is an elective MBA course where MBA students work with organizations to address issues such as feasibility analyses, strategies and labour market surveys. The organizations involved approach the Faculty to participate and pay a fee to participate. The students are required to sign confidentiality agreements and undergo ethics training before they start working with the organizations. All projects are managed by a Faculty member and all reports that are given to companies involve aggregate instead of individual data. The purpose of this presentation is to explore how this course has led to transformative learning both for the students and the organizations. Using the theory of diffusion of innovation, the presentation will group both the students and projects into different categories to exemplify how transformation can occur in learning and, moreover, how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread in experiential learning.

Presented by Dr. Tom Cooper, Faculty of Business Administration, Memorial University
AA-1045

Mastering Einstein's Relativity in 50 Minutes: A Collaborative Exercise in Abstract Reasoning
Location : AA-1043
In a guided, collaborative learning exercise, participants will, in fifty minutes, come to understand the non-intuitive yet profound insights into the nature of space and time described by Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity. Following a brief introduction to the fundamental way in which space and time are intertwined, participants will work in pairs to depict increasingly complex real-world situations on spacetime diagrams, leading to revelations about the relative nature of simultaneity, of past and future, and of space and time intervals. Short video clips will demonstrate how following the consequences of a symmetry of Nature -- in this case, the constancy of the speed of light -- leads to deep insights into the workings of the Universe.

Presented by Dr. David Helfand, Professor of Astronomy, Columbia University
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:0027-04-2018 11:50America/St_JohnsMastering Einstein's Relativity in 50 Minutes: A Collaborative Exercise in Abstract ReasoningIn a guided, collaborative learning exercise, participants will, in fifty minutes, come to understand the non-intuitive yet profound insights into the nature of space and time described by Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity. Following a brief introduction to the fundamental way in which space and time are intertwined, participants will work in pairs to depict increasingly complex real-world situations on spacetime diagrams, leading to revelations about the relative nature of simultaneity, of past and future, and of space and time intervals. Short video clips will demonstrate how following the consequences of a symmetry of Nature -- in this case, the constancy of the speed of light -- leads to deep insights into the workings of the Universe.

Presented by Dr. David Helfand, Professor of Astronomy, Columbia University
AA-1043

Helping Our Students Become Expert Learners
Location : AA-1049
The university classroom is typically focused on the acquisition of knowledge, where the metacognitive skills needed to acquire knowledge are assumed in our students. Unfortunately, this assumption is flawed. Many students enter university lacking in metacognition, both in the monitoring of their own knowledge and learning experiences, and in their ability to control cognition though the implementation of learning strategies. They may present difficulties with self-regulation, making accurate judgments, goal planning, study planning, recognizing bias, or an array of issues related to confidence. Research in this area not only supports the connection between metacognition and learning in higher education, but also suggests that instruction around metacognition should be explicit and infused within regular courses. As instructors, how can we equip our students with these metacognitive skills? During this session, you will learn about the basic elements of metacognition and what the research suggests regarding the nature of metacognitive development in higher education. You will have the opportunity to engage in an assessment exercise designed to target various aspects of metacognition, as well discuss the effectiveness and practicality of other metacognitive-based activities across various learning environments. By the end of the session, you will have a deeper understanding of metacognition, its value for students, as well as practical tools that you can use to transform the metacognition of your own students, ultimately helping them to become expert learners.

Presented by Dr. Amy Todd, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Faculty of Science
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:5527-04-2018 12:45America/St_JohnsHelping Our Students Become Expert LearnersThe university classroom is typically focused on the acquisition of knowledge, where the metacognitive skills needed to acquire knowledge are assumed in our students. Unfortunately, this assumption is flawed. Many students enter university lacking in metacognition, both in the monitoring of their own knowledge and learning experiences, and in their ability to control cognition though the implementation of learning strategies. They may present difficulties with self-regulation, making accurate judgments, goal planning, study planning, recognizing bias, or an array of issues related to confidence. Research in this area not only supports the connection between metacognition and learning in higher education, but also suggests that instruction around metacognition should be explicit and infused within regular courses. As instructors, how can we equip our students with these metacognitive skills? During this session, you will learn about the basic elements of metacognition and what the research suggests regarding the nature of metacognitive development in higher education. You will have the opportunity to engage in an assessment exercise designed to target various aspects of metacognition, as well discuss the effectiveness and practicality of other metacognitive-based activities across various learning environments. By the end of the session, you will have a deeper understanding of metacognition, its value for students, as well as practical tools that you can use to transform the metacognition of your own students, ultimately helping them to become expert learners.

Presented by Dr. Amy Todd, Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Faculty of Science
AA-1049

Transformation through 'Translation': combining rational and affective components of learning in assignment design
Location : AA-1043
The work that we assign to students is central to whether their learning will be transmissional, transactional, or transformative. As Mezirow's theory outlines it, transformational learning happens when students experience a shift in their perspective, transforming how they then behave, interact, and navigate their experiences (Kitchenham, 2008; Calleja, 2014). Grabove notes that transformative learning combines both rational and affective learning processes to meet these ends (1997). However, the process of building assignments that can actively harness these different components and aspects of learning can be daunting. This session introduces a conception of 'translation' as a way to think about, parse, and design engaging activities and assignments that effectively combine rational and affective components of learning to increase learner engagement and the likelihood of transformative learning. * Calleja, Colin. "Jack Mezirow's Conceptualization of Adult Transformative Learning: A review." Journal of Adult and Continuing Education. Vol. 2, No. 1, Spring 2014. * Grabove, Valerie. "The Many Facets of Transformative Learning Theory and Practice." In: Transformative Learning in Action: Insights from Practice. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. no. 74, edited by P. Cranton, pp. 89–96. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Summer 1997. * Kitchenham, Andrew. "The Evolution of John Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory." Journal of Transformative Education. Vol. 6, Issue 2, 2008.

Presented by Dr. Ailsa Craig, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:5527-04-2018 12:45America/St_JohnsTransformation through 'Translation': combining rational and affective components of learning in assignment designThe work that we assign to students is central to whether their learning will be transmissional, transactional, or transformative. As Mezirow's theory outlines it, transformational learning happens when students experience a shift in their perspective, transforming how they then behave, interact, and navigate their experiences (Kitchenham, 2008; Calleja, 2014). Grabove notes that transformative learning combines both rational and affective learning processes to meet these ends (1997). However, the process of building assignments that can actively harness these different components and aspects of learning can be daunting. This session introduces a conception of 'translation' as a way to think about, parse, and design engaging activities and assignments that effectively combine rational and affective components of learning to increase learner engagement and the likelihood of transformative learning. * Calleja, Colin. "Jack Mezirow's Conceptualization of Adult Transformative Learning: A review." Journal of Adult and Continuing Education. Vol. 2, No. 1, Spring 2014. * Grabove, Valerie. "The Many Facets of Transformative Learning Theory and Practice." In: Transformative Learning in Action: Insights from Practice. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education. no. 74, edited by P. Cranton, pp. 89–96. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, Summer 1997. * Kitchenham, Andrew. "The Evolution of John Mezirow's Transformative Learning Theory." Journal of Transformative Education. Vol. 6, Issue 2, 2008.

Presented by Dr. Ailsa Craig, Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences
AA-1043

Leadership in Curricula: A Cross-Disciplinary Partnership
Location : AA-1046
In this session, participants will be exposed to a collaborative approach to leadership learning in curricula. Through a modular approach to curriculum development, the Student Experience Office has developed 20 academic modules which expose students to strength-based leadership, management vs. leadership, and change-making. While this curriculum is being piloted with the School of Pharmacy, the modules are adaptable to any academic discipline. Participants will also be exposed to the integrated role of technology that will be used to build students' understanding of leadership, and the way that they can practice it through their careers as pharmacists. Using web platforms, students will be challenged to not only communicate their leadership competencies, but also write an article promoting how they are putting those competencies into action through their Leadership and Health Promotion group project. Session participants will delve further into the utility and transferability of web platforms for self-expressions of leadership skill development and change-making.

Presented by Ms. Jennifer Crowe, Student Life; Mr. Ryan Murphy, Student Life
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:5527-04-2018 12:45America/St_JohnsLeadership in Curricula: A Cross-Disciplinary PartnershipIn this session, participants will be exposed to a collaborative approach to leadership learning in curricula. Through a modular approach to curriculum development, the Student Experience Office has developed 20 academic modules which expose students to strength-based leadership, management vs. leadership, and change-making. While this curriculum is being piloted with the School of Pharmacy, the modules are adaptable to any academic discipline. Participants will also be exposed to the integrated role of technology that will be used to build students' understanding of leadership, and the way that they can practice it through their careers as pharmacists. Using web platforms, students will be challenged to not only communicate their leadership competencies, but also write an article promoting how they are putting those competencies into action through their Leadership and Health Promotion group project. Session participants will delve further into the utility and transferability of web platforms for self-expressions of leadership skill development and change-making.

Presented by Ms. Jennifer Crowe, Student Life; Mr. Ryan Murphy, Student Life
AA-1046

Instructional design - not just for online course development
Location : AA-1045
Are you looking to write more effective learning objectives? Have you ever wondered if there is a better way to convey a troublesome topic in your course? Are you looking for new and innovative ways to test your students understanding of the content you are teaching? Want to flush out a new idea or activity for your course? Then this drop-in session is for you. A team of instructional designers from CITL will be available to respond to your specific questions and give some guidance to set you on the path to transforming your teaching and learning experience.

Presented by CITL Learning Design & Development Team
Add to Calendar27-04-2018 11:5527-04-2018 12:45America/St_JohnsInstructional design - not just for online course developmentAre you looking to write more effective learning objectives? Have you ever wondered if there is a better way to convey a troublesome topic in your course? Are you looking for new and innovative ways to test your students understanding of the content you are teaching? Want to flush out a new idea or activity for your course? Then this drop-in session is for you. A team of instructional designers from CITL will be available to respond to your specific questions and give some guidance to set you on the path to transforming your teaching and learning experience.

Presented by CITL Learning Design & Development Team
AA-1045

Closing Remarks
12:45pm - 1:00pm
Location : IIC-2001 Auditorium
Closing remarks by Mr. Robert Wells, Intertim Director Centre for Innovation in Teaching & Learning, Memorial University
Lunch for conference delegates
1:00pm - 1:15pm
Location : IIC 2nd Floor Atrium
Take-away lunches will be distributed to conference delegates at the conclusion of the closing remarks

Contact

Centre for Innovation in Teaching and Learning

230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1B 3X9

Postal Address: P.O. Box 4200, St. John's, NL, CANADA, A1C 5S7

Tel: (709) 864-8000